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Referencing - BU Harvard: Book

Referencing Books

Referencing a print or e-book: details, order and format

Instructions how to reference different book formats

Click on the headings below for instructions

Example ebook 

Citing in the main text of your work

  • e.g. A book titled 'The Study Skills Book' (Mcmillan and Weyers 2012) suggests...
  • e.g. According to McMillan and Weyers (2012, p.34) "Personal development planning involves reflecting on your learning, performance and achievements"..

Referencing in list at the end of work

Surname/Family Name, INITIALS., Year. Title of book [online]. Edition (if not the first edition). Place of publication: Publisher.

 

  • e.g. McMillan, K. and Weyers, J., 2012. The study skills book [online]. 3rd edition. Harlow: Pearson.

 

The use of 'ed.' or 'eds.' (for more than one) is used to represent the word 'editor'.

Exampoe book

  Citing in the main text of your work

  • e.g. In a popular study Woods (1999) argued that we have to teach good practices...
  • e.g. As Woods (1999, p.21) said, "good practices must be taught" and so we...
  • e.g. Theory rises out of practice, and once validated, returns to direct or explain the practice (Woods 1999).

Referencing in list at the end of your work

Surname/Family Name, INITIALS., Year. Title of book [online] (if applicable). Edition (if not the first edition). Place of publication: Publisher.

  • e.g. Woods, P., 1999. Successful writing for qualitative researchers. London: Routledge.

In this example, you need to look on the back of the title page to find the date.

If the book is edited, for example if Peter Woods had edited this book, then the reference would read Woods, P., ed. 1999...

The use of 'ed.' or 'eds.' (for more than one) is used to represent the word 'editor'.

print book with two authorsCiting in the main text of your work

  • e.g. Brewerton and Millward (2001) have proposed that...

Referencing in list at the end of your work

Surname/Family Name, INITIALS. and Author's Surname, INITIALS., Year. Title of book [online] (if applicable). Edition (if not the first edition). Place of publication: Publisher.

  • e.g. Brewerton, P. and Millward, L., 2001. Organizational research methods: a guide for students and researchers. London: Sage.

print book with three authorsCiting in the main text of your work

If there are more than two authors the surname of the only first author should be given, followed by et al.

  • e.g. Administration costs amount to 20% of total costs in most projects (McNiff et al.1996).
  • e.g. McNiff et al. (1996, p.12) suggest that "adminstration costs amount to 20% of total costs in most projects".

Referencing in list at the end of your work

1st Surname/Family Name, INITIALS., 2nd Surname/Family Name, INITIALS. and final Surname/Family Name, INITIALS., [etc. if there are more authors]., Year. Title of book [online] (if applicable). Edition (if not the first edition). Place of publication: Publisher.

  • e.g. McNiff, J., Lomax, P. and Whitehead, J., 1996. You and your action research project. London: Routledge.

contribution to an edited book

Citing in the main text of your work

If you refer to a contributor in an edited source, you cite just the contributor, not the editor:

  • e.g. Crete is the largest Greek island and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean (Briassoulis 2004).
  • e.g. According to Briassoulis, in Crete since the 1960s, "tourism has become a leading economic sector" (2004, p.48).

 

Referencing in list at the end of your work

Surname/Family Name of chapter author, INITIALS., Year. Title of contribution. Followed by In: Editor’s Surname/Family Name of book Editor, INITIALS., ed. or eds. (if applicable). (Year of publication, if different to contribution). Title of book [online] (if applicable). Edition (if not the first edition). Place of publication: Publisher, Page number(s) of contribution.

  • e.g. Briassoulis, H., 2004. Crete: endowed by nature, privileged by geography, threatened by tourism? In: Bramwell, B., ed. Coastal mass tourism: diversification and sustainable development in Southern Europe. Clevedon: Channel View, 48-67.

If there is more than one contributing author who wrote the chapter, you must list all authors in the reference list at the end of your work e.g. Smith, A., Jones, T. and Bloggs, J., 2010….

Note: Scanned chapters linked in Brightspace and on unit e-reading lists have been created from print sources located in BU Library and thus should be referenced the same as the print original.