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Psychology: Find Books

Library subject guide for Psychology

How to search for a library book online

Use the box below to search the catalogue

The catalogue contains all BU library owns, and it's a quick way to search for books and multimedia that you can borrow. 

  • Search by title - you can put a comma and then the author's surname to narrow it down, for example Tale of two cities, Dickens
  • Narrow down by date - you can adjust the date range of al;l your results using the sliding bar on the left hand side
  • Narrow down by location -  you can narrow down to one of the 2 libraries, or select 'ebooks' to only see online content.

How to find a book in the library

To find a specific book, you'll need its full shelf mark including letters after the numbers,

Some topics relevant to this subject area are: Shelf mark:
Attitude 152.452
Criminal Psychology 364.3
Design (Decorative Arts): Psychological aspects 745.4019
Human Computer Interaction / User Interface 004.019
Human Physiology
   Ergonomics / Human Factors Engineering
612
620.82
Intellectual Property 346.048
Intelligence, Mental Process
   Cognition, Memory, Thought, Reasoning
153
153.4
Language / Linguistics
   Psycholinguistics
400 / 410
401.9
Natural Language Processing 006.35
Organisational Psychology 158.7
Perception / Visual Perception 153.7 / 152.14
Psychology (general) 150
Research Methods
   Quantitative
   Qualitative
001.42
001.422
001.43
Social Effects of Computing 303.4833
Social Psychology / Organisational Behaviour 302 / 302.35
Sociolinguistics 306.44

Different Types of Academic Books

  • Usually big - you probably won't read from cover to cover.
  • Give a good overall introduction. 
  • Best place to start and find the main areas of debate and discussion.
  • Click here for a good example.
  • Chapters are written by different authors.
  • There is an editor or editors on the cover
  • In referencing you list the author and title of the chapter, and also the details of the book (see referencing guide)
  • A specialist book on one topic. 
  • Often (but not always) just one author.
  • Good for going deeper in academic discussions and debates.
  • Click here for a good example. 
  • A family of books by a publisher on a similar theme/ area. 
  • By different authors/ editors.
  • Can be useful for finding other books on a topic.
  • Festschrifts: Written in honour of a scholar, and the subject matter will be in areas of the scholar's own work and interest. 
  • Conference Proceedings: Sometimes published as a book, and can bring together some of the most recent research in an area.
  • Reference Books: Many books in the library are labelled 'reference only' - what we mean by reference books in this context is that they are books you'd dip into for short articles, definitions or statistics. 
  • Theses: these are PhDs and master's dissertations. These can be very useful for seeing what questions other people are working on.

Essential Links

These are the 3 main links you'll need to use a lot in finding and using books for your worl.

With ebooks you can: search full text; create bookmarks; highlight text; annotate text and avoid fines